Link Roundup – Get it Together, Government

I’ve got a TON of Vagina News saved up, so I’m going to put together related links with abbreviated commentary until we catch up.

To begin, GET IT TOGETHER, GOVERNMENT:

– Reset the ‘Days Without a GOP Rape Mention’ counter and tell Todd Akin to put his shiny shoes on, because Arizona House Representative Trent Franks apparently woke up from a coma today and said, “the incidence of rape resulting in pregnancy are very low.” Deja vomit.

By way of response, let’s revisit ‘The Worst States for Pregnant Rape Victims.’ 

– Next time you see your gynecologist (or anyone else’s) give them a hug, because this week the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists issued a statement castigating state governments for initiating an unprecedented number of bills aimed at restricting women’s reproductive rights. 

– And finally, the Air Force has put Major General Margaret Atwood (that’s a woman, for the record) in charge of the branch’s efforts to curb military sexual assault. Atwood is four steps higher in the chain of command than her predecessor, Lieut. Colonel Jeffrey Krusinski, who was arrested last month for – say it with me – sexual assault. 

 

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I found it. The CRAZIEST state abortion law.

First, a quick fact. Only 1.4% of abortions take place after

the 20th week of gestation. At that point, the choice is often made due to
serious complications that endanger the health of the child, mother, or both.

So,
Georgia’s HB 954. In short, it bans abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy.
Supporters call it the “fetal pain bill”, because the justification is that
fetuses can feel pain at 20 weeks. (There is no medical evidence to support
this.) Opponents call it the “women as livestock bill”, because… Well, you’ll
see.

Here comes the crazy. Be careful, it sneaks up on you.

Crazy – The original version of the bill made no exception
for rape, incest, health of the mother (you know, the usual), OR viability of
the fetus. Many serious birth defects can only be detected after 20 weeks, so
the main effect of the bill would be to force women to carry a non-viable (or
non-alive) fetus to term and delivery.

Crazier – The bill got national attention because State Rep.
Terry England expressed his compassion for women in this situation thusly;
“I’ve had the experience of delivering calves, dead and alive — delivering
pigs, dead and alive. … It breaks our hearts to see those animals not make it.”
He’s not unsympathetic, see? He feels for us ladies, just like he felt for
those pigs.

Craziest – The version that passed – aka, is now law – made
a compromise. The idea is to keep the fetus alive as long as possible, even
when the reason for the abortion is that it has no chance of survival. Here’s
the solution; If the doctor determines the fetus is not viable (the mother gets
no say) and it’s been over 20 weeks, she can have an abortion. But first, she
has to deliver the child vaginally or have a C-section – the abortion has to
take place outside the mother’s body. And if the doctor thinks vaginal delivery
might endanger the fetus on its way to abortion, that doctor is legally
required to perform a C-section instead, regardless of the woman’s wishes, or
face jail time.

I told you.

Google ‘Georgia HB 954’ or ‘fetal pain bill’ to learn more.

Let’s Play… Legal or Illegal!

A pregnant woman gives her employer a doctor’s note saying she shouldn’t lift more than twenty pounds. Her employer refuses to accommodate her. She suffers a miscarriage following a shift doing heavy lifting, and is subsequently fired.

And the answer is… LEGAL.

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 makes it illegal to discriminate against pregnant women in the workplace, meaning they can’t be treated worse than non-pregnant employees. But it does not require employers to make accommodations for pregnant employees – like avoiding strenuous work, or allowing them to carry a water bottle (pregnant women have been fired for both.)

Yesterday, the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act was introduced into the Senate. It would extend disability laws to pregnant women, requiring that employers make accommodations necessary to their health.

Click the link for a fact sheet about the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, and a letter you can send to your representative. Also, Google Pregnant Workers Fairness Act to learn more.